What is PROMPT?

  • PROMPT stands for Prospective Registry Of Multi Plex Testing
  • It is an online registry for patients who have had multi-gene panel testing and have tested positive for a genetic change that may be linked to an increased risk of developing cancer
  • It will be an on-going registry that will be enrolling patients from all over the country for many years

What is the goal of PROMPT?

  • To better understand the cancer risks associated with hereditary cancer genes
  • This will lead to more powerful studies aimed at understanding and defining more specific management recommendations for newer genes included on the Myriad myRisk™ panel

Who is eligible to participate?

  • Patients who have genetic changes (mutations) identified on a hereditary cancer panel
  • The registry is most interested in mutations in genes that are not well characterized (for example, patients with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation will not be included)

How do patients enroll?

  • Enrollment is completely patient driven. Healthcare providers can encourage their patients to enroll, but the patient must register themselves.
  • Eligible patients can enroll in the registry by visiting the website www.promptstudy.org
  • To register, patients will complete a survey about their personal & family history of cancer

What does it involve?

  • Eligible patients can enroll in the registry by visiting the website www.promptstudy.org
  • To register, patients will complete a survey about their personal & family history of cancer
  • All personal information is entered on a secure system and patients can either opt-in or opt-out of being contacted about future research opportunities
  • There is no cost to patients or providers to participate

Where to learn more?

What is Myriad’s involvement?

  • Myriad will be including a letter from PROMPT in Myriad myRisk test results so patients can learn more and self-enroll into the study
  • Myriad will be fully supporting the promotion of PROMPT to help advance the scientific knowledge and clinical understanding of the newer hereditary cancer genes